Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Vintage cool: frozen dessert recipes

Vintage Recipe Thursday is meant to preserve your own original vintage family recipes, or out-of-print, copyright-free recipes from old cookbooks, magazines, newspapers or postcards. You're invited! Get the details by clicking to the Vintage Recipe Thursday Homepage. I post recipes from the Household Searchlight Recipe Book, first published in 1931. My 16th printing is from 1943. What will you post?

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This post is also shared with Vintage Thingy Thursday.

July is national ice cream month and it's still very hot in many parts of the country, so I'm sharing some more frozen dessert recipes this week. This time I've chosen Lemon Ice, Coca Cola Ice, Ginger Ale Ice and Root Beer Ice. They're all refreshing.

If you are trying to get away from corn syrup found in the New Coke recipe, buy Kosher Coke which is made with sugar. It is sold around the time of Jewish High Holidays and usually has a yellow cap to identify it. Another way is to buy Coke at a Mexican grocery store where they sell Coke which has been bottled in Mexico. You'll have to check the ingredients to make sure of what you are getting, but they are usually made with sugar too. My local Mexican grocery store even carries Coca-Cola in glass bottles which is always better tasting than plastic, and guarantees that there won't be any BPA or any other kind of plastic leaching.

Have a great summer with your children and grand-children,


 
Lemon Ice Recipe
2 cups water
1 cup sugar
Few grains of salt
6 Tablespoons lemon juice

Combine sugar, salt, and water. Heat to boiling. Boil 5 minutes. Cool. Add lemon juice. Freeze. 4 servings.

 

Coca Cola Ice Recipe
2 cups water
2 bottles Coca Cola
1/2 cup lemon juice
3/4 cup sugar


Combine sugar and water. Heat to boiling. Boil 5 minutes. Cool. Add lemon juice and coca cola. Freeze. Food coloring may be added if desired.* 8 servings. 

*Joy's Note: If you don't like food coloring because of its bad press, especially on its effects on children, buy organic food coloring. Organic food coloring does not contain a single synthetic man-made chemical.



 
Ginger Ale Ice Recipe
2 cups water
2 bottles ginger ale
1 cup orange juice
1/2 cup lemon juice
3/4 cup sugar


Combine sugar and water. Heat to boiling. Boil 5 minutes. Cool. Add fruit juices and ginger ale. Freeze. Food coloring may be added if desired.* 10 servings. 

*Joy's Note: If you don't like food coloring because of its bad press, especially on its effects on children, buy organic food coloring. Organic food coloring does not contain a single synthetic, man-made chemical.

Root Beer Ice Recipe
1 bottle root beer
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon sugar
few grains salt


Combine ingredients.  Mix until blended. Freeze. 2 servings.

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Click the link.




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9 comments:

  1. Hi, hope it's OK to contact you here. We would love to include your blog on our giveaway search engine: Giveaway Scout (http://www.giveawayscout.com). Have a look and if interested, use our online form to add your blog (http://www.giveawayscout.com/addblog/ ). thanks, Josh

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  2. I love the sound of that ginger ale ice. Also, I didn't even know that they made kosher coke! My kiddos are always begging for pop. I am going to have to go to my local Mexican grocery and read the ingredient labels on all of their drinks. As bad as sugar is, it's better than HFCS!

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  3. I love them all. Just don't know which one to try first. I have some ice cream on my blog also.

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  4. I just love the photos of the vintage coke items especially with the Victorian ladies!

    Debbie

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  5. I will have to try the lemon ice this week for my grandsons. They would love it. Thanks for sharing.

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  6. What great information....I am going to the Mexican grocery store to check out their coke products! I would have not thought to do that.Love your coke memorabilia. Have a wonderful VTT!

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  7. Thanks for the Coke info! And those recipes are sure to be a hit in the heat waves we've been having :)

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  8. Hi Joy. These recipes sound so refreshing. How big are the bottles you used? Meaning how many ounces/ml of liquid goes into each recipe? Thanks!

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  9. Annika: These are vintage recipes so the glass bottles were much smaller than today. They made several sizes depending on region and year. The cookbook is a 1943 edition published in Topeka, Kansas. For this kind of recipe though, it really doesn't need to be exact, it's not baking, it's more to the individual's taste. Still, I googled it for you so you could get the answer from a Coca-Cola expert:
    "Collectors Weekly: What’s the most common size of Coca-Cola bottle?
    McCoy: On average probably the 6.5-ounce size because they made that size for so long. They made it from 1915 to 1967. There are a lot of those out there. They didn’t start to make larger sizes until 1955."
    I hope this information helps you and the other readers. Thank you for stopping by. Enjoy! :-)

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